Zimbabwe’s Tatenda Ruswa is introducing digital transformation in rural schools

Written by Lonwabo Marele, CEO at Successful Journals

 

Cape Peninsula University of Technology alumni Tatenda Ruswa is on a mission to combat digital infrastructure issues in rural and community schools in Africa.

 

Originally from Harare, in Zimbabwe, Ruswa is the founder of InOgital, a software company that drives digital transformation through unique innovative means.

 

One of their projects, that led them to winning the bonus category: EdTech pitches, at the Township Tech Hackathon run by the Cape Innovation and Technology Initiative, in partnership with the City of Cape Town, ABSA, Telkom and Injini in April — was about introducing smart devices for school pupils and teaching school teachers more about computer skills.

 

“The competition was tense but it gave us the confidence that we have an amazing offer and we can perhaps engage with a lot of people. It was an honour and privilege,” he says.

 

Head of Marketing and Ecosystem at CiTi, Marietjie Engelbrecht says every year the quality of the entrepreneurial ideas and solutions just get better.

 

“The Cape Innovation and Technology Initiative is very proud of our young entrepreneurial talent and along with our sponsors hope to continue to offer a variety of opportunities for the youth to explore building their own tech businesses and solving issues in their communities.  A special thank you to Absa and Telkom Future Makers for supporting the 2022 TownshipTech Hackathon and Pitch Competition,” she says.

 

Ruswa says the world is moving towards the fourth industrial revolution, however, there remains a huge gap within schools in previously disadvantaged areas on the continent.

 

“In the case that we, for example, are hit by another pandemic, we want to make sure that no kid or teacher is left behind in learning again due to the lack of the required infrastructure. We are now making things better than how we had them in 2020,” says Ruswa.

 

“When dealing with schools in rural or township areas, you will find that the educators are afraid to add technology in the schools. That is because they were trained to be teachers and not tech experts. There is a need for us to train teachers. If we empower teachers, the students will receive it,” he adds.

 

The young entrepreneur says they want to bridge the gap between rural schools in Africa and the rest of the world. One of the schools they work with in Gugulethu, I.D Mkhize High School, received sim cards from Vodacom, which makes it simple for InOgital to share new devices as well as to embark on the digital transformation process.

 

“You have to learn to believe in yourself. Believe you can do it. Believe you have what it takes to impart in the world. Aim to be a successful person. A successful person does not necessarily mean you have millions. Being successful is looking at the world around you and imparting it with the investment of your personality. Thrive to be a successful person by making the world around you better than you found it. It does not matter where you are born, it matters how you finish,” concludes Ruswa.

 

To learn more about InOgital, visit their website at www.inogital.com

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